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Beginners Linux Questions
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: bobrics    Posted: 2006-01-25 17:51:37    Length: 1,129 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
Hi,
I have several beginners linux questions. I've tried searching the
group for the answers, but didn't find exactly what I wanted. I am
using Fedora Core 4.

1. I would like to save the way I set up my folder view and apply it to
all folders. I am using Nautilius. What I want is to always see files
in a list. I want to have an address bar where I can manually
type/modify the directory path as in Windows. Is there an option to
have a tree-view on the side to quickly find the directory like in
Windows Explorer? Maybe I should use another utility intstead of
Nautilius to achieve what I want?

2. What is the shortcut to call the terminal window?
3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)
4. Is there a Task Manager equivalent in Fedora? Is there a shortcut to
call for it like CTRL-SHIFT-ESC (Windows XP)?

I'll add more questions as I go on. These are the ones bug me the most
at the moment.

Thank you

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: Walter Mautner    Posted: 2006-01-26 01:04:20    Length: 3,217 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
bobrics wrote:

QUOTE
Hi,
I have several beginners linux questions. I've tried searching the
group for the answers, but didn't find exactly what I wanted. I am
using Fedora Core 4.

1. I would like to save the way I set up my folder view and apply it to
all folders. I am using Nautilius. What I want is to always see files
in a list. I want to have an address bar where I can manually
type/modify the directory path as in Windows. Is there an option to
have a tree-view on the side to quickly find the directory like in
Windows Explorer? Maybe I should use another utility intstead of
Nautilius to achieve what I want?

You can specify list view but for the other features ... well, try

konqueror. You will have to ilet your package manager install kde then.

QUOTE
2. What is the shortcut to call the terminal window?

Depends upon the window manager, you can define one. Or use the symbol in
the quickstart bar "like windows". However, linux is not windows :)
I made my (kde) desktop always start with a terminal window minimized.

QUOTE
3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)

Use the backspace key?

QUOTE
4. Is there a Task Manager equivalent in Fedora? Is there a shortcut to
call for it like CTRL-SHIFT-ESC (Windows XP)?

ksysguard (kde) and gnome-system-monitor.

Since I am a kde-guy, I use the kde workplace configuration applet .
However, as a keyboard (ab)user I also have the alt-f2 "universal" shortcut
(kde, again) and type in any command I want then. Or a little "execute"
commandline applet on the taskbar, where I can type in urls as well.

QUOTE
I'll add more questions as I go on. These are the ones bug me the most
at the moment.

Much to discover yet, and - guess what - there is Google.


--
vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse detected penguin patterns
on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
incompatible products.  Reactivate MS software.
Linux 2.6.14-mm1 [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: d    Posted: 2006-01-26 12:09:55    Length: 1,105 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
First off, take off the Windows hat.  You're now working within a
superior operating system and have no need of those bad habits formed
by working within Windows.

1. I don't use a graphical file manager so I won't address this but to
say, you're better off trying to learn navigating the Linux file system
through the "cd" and "ls" commands.

2. Shortcut? (hehehe), Forget About It!  The terminal should be
accessible from your panel menu.

3. Using "stty -a" and do a "man stty" you will learn about your
keyboard/terminal configuration. Typically, ctrl+h will delete a
character entered and crtl+w will delete and word, etc.  But unlike
Windows you can configure/reconfigure these settings anyway you like.

4. Depending on the desktop environment you're using ie KDE or GNOME.
Each has a system monitor utility similar to Windows task manager if
you need that type of thing.  Or for the Linux geeks like me, I use the
"ps" command.  Again try "man ps".

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: H-Man    Posted: 2006-01-26 12:37:31    Length: 2,477 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
On 25 Jan 2006 14:51:37 -0800, bobrics wrote:

QUOTE
Hi,
I have several beginners linux questions. I've tried searching the
group for the answers, but didn't find exactly what I wanted. I am
using Fedora Core 4.

1. I would like to save the way I set up my folder view and apply it to
all folders. I am using Nautilius. What I want is to always see files
in a list. I want to have an address bar where I can manually
type/modify the directory path as in Windows. Is there an option to
have a tree-view on the side to quickly find the directory like in
Windows Explorer? Maybe I should use another utility intstead of
Nautilius to achieve what I want?

2. What is the shortcut to call the terminal window?
3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)
4. Is there a Task Manager equivalent in Fedora? Is there a shortcut to
call for it like CTRL-SHIFT-ESC (Windows XP)?

I'll add more questions as I go on. These are the ones bug me the most
at the moment.

Thank you

1) Nautilus can do all of this. In Nautilus go to Edit then Preferences. In
the Views tab select the view you'd like. In Tree View Defaults, deselect
Show Only Folders. In the Behavior tab, select the Always open in Browser
Windows option. The rest is to your preferences. Once you have it set,
close Nautilus and restart it. It should look close to what you want now.
You should have a pane on the right. If it's something other than Tree,
like Information or something ike that, just click on word "Information" or
whatever it is and select Tree from the list. You should be close now.

2) Depends on what your terminal prog is, mine starts with "gnome-terminal"
no quotes. I'm on Ubuntu though.

3) CTRL-W erases the linne before the cursor, CTRL-C just kills the command
and starts over at a new prompt.

4) AFAIK, there are some out there that can be installed, but GNOME doesn't
come with one. The task switcher works the same though ALT-TAB

Hope this helps
 
--
HK

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: Robert Newson    Posted: 2006-01-26 14:30:39    Length: 2,654 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
H-Man wrote:

QUOTE
On 25 Jan 2006 14:51:37 -0800, bobrics wrote:
....


QUOTE
3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)
....


QUOTE
3) CTRL-W erases the linne before the cursor, CTRL-C just kills the command
and starts over at a new prompt.

CTRL-U (^U) erases the whole line regardless of where the cursor is.

CTRL-R (^R) redraws the input line (in case the display has got messed up).

CTRL-D (^D) is an interesting and useful control char:
    if there is no input whatsoever typed (with the cursor next to the
    prompt) it will close down that terminal.  However with characters typed
    (next to the prompt), it will bring up a list of all commands (in your
    path) that start with those characters.  If a space preceeds the
    characters after which the ^D is pressed, then a list of files that match
    the characters typed (in the relevant directory will be displayed.

CTRL-I (^I or TAB or -]|) this is similar to ^D except that nothing happens
    if pressed immediately after the prompt (except the terminal bell
    sounding).  After characters typed, it acts like ^D in finding files,
    except that it inserts into the input the matching filename found.  If
    more than one filename matches the given characters, the common part of
    the filenames is inserted and the terminal bell sounds.  If it matches
    only one filename, that name is inserted into the input; if the file is a
    directory (folder in Windows speak) it is followed by a slash (/) ready
    for the next component of the file's path name (if any), otherwise it is
    followed by a space.

Hope you find these terminal control chars useful.

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: Lew Pitcher    Posted: 2006-01-26 14:51:22    Length: 1,422 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Robert Newson wrote:
QUOTE
H-Man wrote:

On 25 Jan 2006 14:51:37 -0800, bobrics wrote:

...

3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)

...

3) CTRL-W erases the linne before the cursor, CTRL-C just kills the
command
and starts over at a new prompt.


CTRL-U (^U) erases the whole line regardless of where the cursor is.
[snip]


And, all of these are customizable.
The stty(1) command ("man 1 stty") permits you to change all of these to more
convenient values if you want, or even reset then back to their default values.



- --
Lew Pitcher
IT Specialist, Enterprise Data Systems,
Enterprise Technology Solutions, TD Bank Financial Group

(Opinions expressed are my own, not my employers')
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[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: Chris F.A. Johnson    Posted: 2006-01-27 04:11:11    Length: 1,965 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
On 2006-01-25, bobrics wrote:
QUOTE

2. What is the shortcut to call the terminal window?

   "The" terminal window? You have a choice of several: xterm, rxvt,
   konsole, gnome-terminal, eterm, etc...

QUOTE
3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)

   The readline command, kill-whole-line, is not bound to any key by
   default. You can bind it to whatever key you like, by putting a
   line in your ~/.inputrc file. E.g., I have:

"ek": kill-whole-line

   That binds it to Esc-k, which may also be Alt-k.

   The default bindings include (C- = Control, M- = Meta):

      C-U  - Erase from cursor to beginning of line
      C-K  - Erase from the cursor to the end of the line
      C-W  - Erase the word to the left of the cursor
      M-d  - Erase word to the right of the cursor

--
   Chris F.A. Johnson, author   |    [http://cfaj.freeshell.org]
   Shell Scripting Recipes:     |  My code in this post, if any,
   A Problem-Solution Approach  |         is released under the
   2005, Apress                 |    GNU General Public Licence

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: goarilla    Posted: 2006-01-28 04:37:40    Length: 2,212 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
On Thu, 26 Jan 2006 19:30:39 +0000, Robert Newson wrote:

QUOTE
H-Man wrote:

On 25 Jan 2006 14:51:37 -0800, bobrics wrote:
...

3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)
...

3) CTRL-W erases the linne before the cursor, CTRL-C just kills the command
and starts over at a new prompt.

CTRL-U (^U) erases the whole line regardless of where the cursor is.

CTRL-R (^R) redraws the input line (in case the display has got messed up).

CTRL-D (^D) is an interesting and useful control char:
if there is no input whatsoever typed (with the cursor next to the
prompt) it will close down that terminal.  However with characters typed
(next to the prompt), it will bring up a list of all commands (in your
path) that start with those characters.  If a space preceeds the
characters after which the ^D is pressed, then a list of files that match
the characters typed (in the relevant directory will be displayed.

CTRL-I (^I or TAB or -]|) this is similar to ^D except that nothing happens
if pressed immediately after the prompt (except the terminal bell
sounding).  After characters typed, it acts like ^D in finding files,
except that it inserts into the input the matching filename found.  If
more than one filename matches the given characters, the common part of
the filenames is inserted and the terminal bell sounds.  If it matches
only one filename, that name is inserted into the input; if the file is a
directory (folder in Windows speak) it is followed by a slash (/) ready
for the next component of the file's path name (if any), otherwise it is
followed by a space.

Hope you find these terminal control chars useful.
That CTRL-D doesn't work for me; except closing the xterm with no input


[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: bobrics    Posted: 2006-01-30 15:04:54    Length: 2,438 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
Thanks for your advices, everyone!
I am liking Linux more and more. I have a couple of utils I was used to
in Windows that still keep me attached to it. I'll list them below. Pls
let me know of the equivalents in Linux. Here are some more
questions...

1.
QUOTE
Depends upon the window manager, you can define one. Or use the symbol in
the quickstart bar "like windows". However, linux is not windows :)
I made my (kde) desktop always start with a terminal window minimized.
How did you make it to start automatically and minimized? that would be

interesting to find out.
Thanks for the advices. I will get into command prompt, but would like
to have a backward compatibility as well, especially in the beginning
and in the cases when I would not want to type long names.

2.
BTW, here is a question relating to long file names...
Which MP3 player and which DVD/divx players are you using?
My favorite ones in Windows are Winamp and Windows Media player or
Media Player Classic.

3. Another util I like is Active Desktop Calendar. It's a transparent
calendar on the background, summarizing the tasks. I've seen an
equivalent utility in Fedora, but I am wondering if it is possible to
do the following.
If I'll reformat one of my NTFS partitions to FAT32 to make it
accessible by Fedora and install some program both, on Windows and
Linux (I would still need to use Windows sometimes)... and make the
program to store all the calendar data (tasks, todos, memos) on that
drive. If the program stores the info in the same format (both in
windows and linux), that would be ideal! - I would be able to modify
the tasks from both of the systems - and keep them synchronized!
IS THIS possible? Has someone done this before?

4. Regarding NTFS partition, I've realized that it's not supported by
Fedora Core 4. There is some project going on to support it, but I
haven't checked out whether it's possible or not. Do you think it's
better of right now to keep all non-linux partitions FAT32 except for
C: (with Windows)?

Thank you again

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: bobrics    Posted: 2006-01-30 16:43:11    Length: 772 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
QUOTE
The readline command, kill-whole-line, is not bound to any key by
default. You can bind it to whatever key you like, by putting a
line in your ~/.inputrc file. E.g., I have:

"ek": kill-whole-line

I didn't have .inputrc file in my root directory. So, I've created it
and added the line:

"ek": kill-whole-line

I've tested ESC-k in the terminal and VIM, and it does not have an
effect.
The other shortcuts you've mentioned work as described. What is 'meta'
though?


Thank you

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: Chris F.A. Johnson    Posted: 2006-01-30 17:13:58    Length: 1,985 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
On 2006-01-30, bobrics wrote:
QUOTE
The readline command, kill-whole-line, is not bound to any key by
default. You can bind it to whatever key you like, by putting a
line in your ~/.inputrc file. E.g., I have:

"ek": kill-whole-line

I didn't have .inputrc file in my root directory. So, I've created it
and added the line:

    It belongs in your home directory, not the root directory.

    To make it active in the current shell, press Ctl-X Ctl-R. It will
    automatically be in effect in new shells.

QUOTE
"ek": kill-whole-line

I've tested ESC-k in the terminal and VIM, and it does not have an
effect.

    This has nothing to do with vim.

    Did you try Alt-K?

QUOTE
The other shortcuts you've mentioned work as described. What is 'meta'
though?

    Usually the Alt key.

--
   Chris F.A. Johnson, author   |    [http://cfaj.freeshell.org]
   Shell Scripting Recipes:     |  My code in this post, if any,
   A Problem-Solution Approach  |         is released under the
   2005, Apress                 |    GNU General Public Licence

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: Walter Mautner    Posted: 2006-01-30 18:26:57    Length: 4,090 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
bobrics wrote:

QUOTE
Thanks for your advices, everyone!
I am liking Linux more and more. I have a couple of utils I was used to
in Windows that still keep me attached to it. I'll list them below. Pls
let me know of the equivalents in Linux. Here are some more
questions...

1.
.....
How did you make it to start automatically and minimized? that would be
interesting to find out.

Just save a kde session with your settings and  the minimized konsole
window. Switch your kde preferences to "restore manually saved session".

QUOTE
Thanks for the advices. I will get into command prompt, but would like
to have a backward compatibility as well, especially in the beginning
and in the cases when I would not want to type long names.

2.
BTW, here is a question relating to long file names...
Which MP3 player and which DVD/divx players are you using?
My favorite ones in Windows are Winamp and Windows Media player or
Media Player Classic.

xmms for gnome and amarok for kde (mp3 players).

Xine or gmplayer (you will need the plf-nonfree repository for viewing dvds
and other interesting stuff) for videos

QUOTE
3. Another util I like is Active Desktop Calendar. It's a transparent
calendar on the background, summarizing the tasks. I've seen an
equivalent utility in Fedora, but I am wondering if it is possible to
do the following.
If I'll reformat one of my NTFS partitions to FAT32 to make it
accessible by Fedora and install some program both, on Windows and
Linux (I would still need to use Windows sometimes)... and make the
program to store all the calendar data (tasks, todos, memos) on that
drive. If the program stores the info in the same format (both in
windows and linux), that would be ideal! - I would be able to modify
the tasks from both of the systems - and keep them synchronized!
IS THIS possible? Has someone done this before?

Don't think it will work that way. Isn't there a calender plugin for

thunderbird? That program should work with the same configs from within
windows as well. But then ... with fat32 you have no fileystem security,
and everyone can accidently or by intent mess your data.

QUOTE
4. Regarding NTFS partition, I've realized that it's not supported by
Fedora Core 4. There is some project going on to support it, but I
haven't checked out whether it's possible or not. Do you think it's
better of right now to keep all non-linux partitions FAT32 except for
C: (with Windows)?

FAT32 has some limitations, like maximum filesize (inconvenient at least for

dvd images *g*) and no access policies (so everyone can delete everything).
You can still have write support with captive-ntfs, but like there is
perfect read support for ntfs in linux, you will find read support for
ext2/3/reiser as freeware/oss programs for windows.

--
vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse detected penguin patterns
on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
incompatible products.  Reactivate MS software.
Linux 2.6.14-mm1 [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: Mr Sneeze    Posted: 2006-01-30 21:08:59    Length: 2,811 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
bobrics wrote:
QUOTE
Hi,
I have several beginners linux questions. I've tried searching the
group for the answers, but didn't find exactly what I wanted. I am
using Fedora Core 4.

Well, if you are a beginner, then I would suggest GETTING THE FUCK OFF
OF HERE. YOURE A MORON, and WE DONT WANT YOU HERE.

QUOTE
1. I would like to save the way I set up my folder view and apply it to
all
snip because blah blah blah blah blah...


I bet you would, you idiot.  Think you are gonna have us do it for you?


QUOTE

2. What is the shortcut to call the terminal window?

Oh dear god... How about "Yo! terminal window!"   Heres a clue,
skippy... BUY A BOOK. Oh wait.. you thought EVERYTHING was free when
you downloaded a free OS, including tech support....

QUOTE
3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)

DOS? If you like DOS so damn much, GO BACK TO IT


QUOTE
4. Is there a Task Manager equivalent in Fedora? Is there a shortcut to
call for it like CTRL-SHIFT-ESC (Windows XP)?

Format your harddrive...better yet... put your XP CD in, and reboot
your computer.  Youll eventually find your "Task Manager" equivalent.

QUOTE
I'll add more questions as I go on. These are the ones bug me the most
at the moment.

And we will collectively tell you to GO THE FUCK AWAY.  We HATE Windows
users and you are the worst kind.

Sincerely,

Your helpful and friendly linux community :)

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: Beginners Linux Questions
Author: Aljosha Filippov    Posted: 2006-01-31 01:14:48    Length: 2,099 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
On Mon, 2006-01-30 at 18:08 -0800, Mr Sneeze wrote:
QUOTE
bobrics wrote:
Hi,
I have several beginners linux questions. I've tried searching the
group for the answers, but didn't find exactly what I wanted. I am
using Fedora Core 4.

Well, if you are a beginner, then I would suggest GETTING THE FUCK OFF
OF HERE. YOURE A MORON, and WE DONT WANT YOU HERE.

1. I would like to save the way I set up my folder view and apply it to
all
snip because blah blah blah blah blah...

I bet you would, you idiot.  Think you are gonna have us do it for you?



2. What is the shortcut to call the terminal window?

Oh dear god... How about "Yo! terminal window!"   Heres a clue,
skippy... BUY A BOOK. Oh wait.. you thought EVERYTHING was free when
you downloaded a free OS, including tech support....

3. In terminal, when I've typed in a line and would like to erase it
completely, what is the shortcut for that? (similar to ESC in DOS)

DOS? If you like DOS so damn much, GO BACK TO IT


4. Is there a Task Manager equivalent in Fedora? Is there a shortcut to
call for it like CTRL-SHIFT-ESC (Windows XP)?

Format your harddrive...better yet... put your XP CD in, and reboot
your computer.  Youll eventually find your "Task Manager" equivalent.

I'll add more questions as I go on. These are the ones bug me the most
at the moment.

And we will collectively tell you to GO THE FUCK AWAY.  We HATE Windows
users and you are the worst kind.

Sincerely,

Your helpful and friendly linux community :)

Cool down Sneezy,

Linux users come here for help,
not for being sent away and called "moron" "asshole" and "windows user"
Come on...

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