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wicked wiki problems
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: the man with no idea    Posted: 2005-08-29 16:17:02    Length: 1,671 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
Well I've been trying for ever to get my Belkin F5D7050 usb wireless dongle
to work to no avail. I happened across some instructions (the easiest I've
seen) that went like this:
1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads
2) Open a console in the download directory.
3) Unpack the tarball with the following command:
code:# tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz
4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module
5) Type:
code:# make
6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

etc, etc.

I got stuck at stage 3, I couldn't get the tarball to unpack but got an
error message. So I unpacked it on my windows machine using ALZip (which is
a great freeware utility) and copied the unpacked stuff into tmp.

4: managed to navigate to the right subdirectory
/tmp/rt2750-cvs-20050813/Module (it took me a while before I realised that
the capitalization is important).

5: typed make and got the following:
make: *** /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk/build:
No such file or directory. Stop.
rt2570.ko failed to build!
make: *** [module] Error 1

Now I do have a /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk directory but there is no build
subdirectory. Should there be one?

Could the problem be with the tarball (since the tar command just produced
an error) - although it did unpack using ALZip in win XP?

Any help appreciated.

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: Mike Todd    Posted: 2005-08-29 22:24:15    Length: 3,209 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
"the man with no idea" [no.spam@thanks] wrote in message
news:yPLQe.1216$76.136@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net...
QUOTE
Well I've been trying for ever to get my Belkin F5D7050 usb wireless
dongle
to work to no avail. I happened across some instructions (the easiest I've
seen) that went like this:
1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads
2) Open a console in the download directory.
3) Unpack the tarball with the following command:
code:# tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

Please note that "code:# " is the system prompt.  What it means is that you
have logged on as "super user" because of the "#" ending the prompt.

QUOTE
4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module
5) Type:
code:# make
6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

etc, etc.

I got stuck at stage 3, I couldn't get the tarball to unpack but got an
error message. So I unpacked it on my windows machine using ALZip (which
is
a great freeware utility) and copied the unpacked stuff into tmp.

A tarball contains not just files but also directory structures.
Unarchiving the file on a Windows system just gives you the files and does
not create the right "directories" on your Unix/Linux system.  That is a
precursor to failure of the process.

QUOTE

4: managed to navigate to the right subdirectory
/tmp/rt2750-cvs-20050813/Module (it took me a while before I realised that
the capitalization is important).

5: typed make and got the following:
make: *** /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk/build:
No such file or directory. Stop.
rt2570.ko failed to build!
make: *** [module] Error 1

Now I do have a /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk directory but there is no build
subdirectory. Should there be one?

Could the problem be with the tarball (since the tar command just produced
an error) - although it did unpack using ALZip in win XP?

Hopefully, you included the "code:# " in your command to process the tarball
and using the correct command will "fix" the problems...

QUOTE

Any help appreciated.


--

Mike Todd

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: BearItAll    Posted: 2005-08-30 10:11:47    Length: 5,823 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
On Mon, 29 Aug 2005 22:17:02 +0000, the man with no idea wrote:

QUOTE
Well I've been trying for ever to get my Belkin F5D7050 usb wireless dongle
to work to no avail. I happened across some instructions (the easiest I've
seen) that went like this:
1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads
2) Open a console in the download directory.
3) Unpack the tarball with the following command:
code:# tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz
4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module
5) Type:
code:# make
6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

etc, etc.

I got stuck at stage 3, I couldn't get the tarball to unpack but got an
error message. So I unpacked it on my windows machine using ALZip (which is
a great freeware utility) and copied the unpacked stuff into tmp.

4: managed to navigate to the right subdirectory
/tmp/rt2750-cvs-20050813/Module (it took me a while before I realised that
the capitalization is important).

5: typed make and got the following:
make: *** /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk/build:
No such file or directory. Stop.
rt2570.ko failed to build!
make: *** [module] Error 1

Now I do have a /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk directory but there is no build
subdirectory. Should there be one?

Could the problem be with the tarball (since the tar command just produced
an error) - although it did unpack using ALZip in win XP?

Any help appreciated.

As mike said, on the assumption you typed exactly as you printed it here,
you are likely to be typing the prompt as well as the command. But I
also noticed a missing step. So this is you list again, with a couple of
hints as well.

1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads

Have a directory that is just for this sort of thing, i.e. downloads.

mkdir downloads

Then make sure your browser is pointing there when it offers the save
directory. Do the same if you use 'wget'. It makes it easy for you to find
them, also you may occasionally want useful downloads written to CD/DVD
and this way you can grab the whole directory.

2) Open a console in the download directory.

3) Unpack the tarball with the
QUOTE
following command: code:# tar -xzf
rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

Change to your downloads directory.

cd downloads
tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

This unzips the file, then extracts contents to the file structure. This
is important because the 'make' command will use all relative file
commands. For example it might include one of it's sub directories

.../includethis/somefile

Which may or may not have been there when you extracted using your Windows
program.

You will see tar a lot, also 'gz' files. You can do the same extract in
two stages like this,

gunzip rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

If you then type

ls

You will see the 'gz' file has been replaced with.

rt2500-cvs-daily.tar
(it has been unzipped)

Then the command

tar -xf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar

Extracts the files to a relative file structure. Which means it produces
the original structure that was included in the tar file, but starting at
the current directory.


4) Type:
QUOTE
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module

cd rt2500-cvs-daily/Module


QUOTE
5) Type:
code:# make

There was a step missing in your instructions.

su

Which will prompt you for your root password. Make will not build
successfully, in this case, if you run it as a standard user.

make

Then watch the screen, at the end of the make you are told whether it was
built successfully.

QUOTE
6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

As you are still root you can just type,

insmod rt2500.ko


I think your instructions will then take you into 'enabling' and then the
security aspect for general wifi connectivity, also there will be a
process of 'discovering' your wireless router. But I suspect it will take
you through doing all of that using GUI tools, so I wont try to guess the
next part for you and you will find theirs easier to follow anyway.

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: the man with no idea    Posted: 2005-08-30 14:17:48    Length: 3,416 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
QUOTE
1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads
2) Open a console in the download directory.
3) Unpack the tarball with the following command:
code:# tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

Please note that "code:# " is the system prompt.  What it means is that
you
have logged on as "super user" because of the "#" ending the prompt.

well, I did try code:# etc and got a bash message that there was no command
code and twigged that I probably shouldn't type it

QUOTE
4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module
5) Type:
code:# make
6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

etc, etc.

I got stuck at stage 3, I couldn't get the tarball to unpack but got an
error message. So I unpacked it on my windows machine using ALZip (which
is
a great freeware utility) and copied the unpacked stuff into tmp.

A tarball contains not just files but also directory structures.
Unarchiving the file on a Windows system just gives you the files and does
not create the right "directories" on your Unix/Linux system.  That is a
precursor to failure of the process.


Doing the unpacking on my windows machine did produce a folder with

subfolders - so I assumed it was OK - guess not.


QUOTE
4: managed to navigate to the right subdirectory
/tmp/rt2750-cvs-20050813/Module (it took me a while before I realised
that
the capitalization is important).

5: typed make and got the following:
make: *** /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk/build:
No such file or directory. Stop.
rt2570.ko failed to build!
make: *** [module] Error 1

Now I do have a /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk directory but there is no
build
subdirectory. Should there be one?

Could the problem be with the tarball (since the tar command just
produced
an error) - although it did unpack using ALZip in win XP?

Hopefully, you included the "code:# " in your command to process the
tarball
and using the correct command will "fix" the problems...


Now this is where you've really lost me - above "code:#" was a prompt - now

are you saying that I should type it? If it wasn't recognised before, why
would it be now?????


QUOTE
Any help appreciated.


--

Mike Todd



[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: the man with no idea    Posted: 2005-08-30 14:17:49    Length: 7,385 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
"BearItAll" [bearitall@rassler.co.uk] wrote in message
news:pan.2005.08.30.16.11.47.140307@rassler.co.uk...
QUOTE
On Mon, 29 Aug 2005 22:17:02 +0000, the man with no idea wrote:

Well I've been trying for ever to get my Belkin F5D7050 usb wireless
dongle
to work to no avail. I happened across some instructions (the easiest
I've
seen) that went like this:
1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads
2) Open a console in the download directory.
3) Unpack the tarball with the following command:
code:# tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz
4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module
5) Type:
code:# make
6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

etc, etc.

I got stuck at stage 3, I couldn't get the tarball to unpack but got an
error message. So I unpacked it on my windows machine using ALZip (which
is
a great freeware utility) and copied the unpacked stuff into tmp.

4: managed to navigate to the right subdirectory
/tmp/rt2750-cvs-20050813/Module (it took me a while before I realised
that
the capitalization is important).

5: typed make and got the following:
make: *** /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk/build:
No such file or directory. Stop.
rt2570.ko failed to build!
make: *** [module] Error 1

Now I do have a /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk directory but there is no
build
subdirectory. Should there be one?

Could the problem be with the tarball (since the tar command just
produced
an error) - although it did unpack using ALZip in win XP?

Any help appreciated.

As mike said, on the assumption you typed exactly as you printed it here,
you are likely to be typing the prompt as well as the command.

nope


But I also noticed a missing step. So this is you list again, with a couple
of
QUOTE
hints as well.

1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads

Have a directory that is just for this sort of thing, i.e. downloads.

mkdir downloads

Then make sure your browser is pointing there when it offers the save
directory.

Note - not using the internet on the linux machine - due to position I need
to get the wireless adapter working before I can use the web.


Do the same if you use 'wget'. It makes it easy for you to find
QUOTE
them, also you may occasionally want useful downloads written to CD/DVD
and this way you can grab the whole directory.

2) Open a console in the download directory.

3) Unpack the tarball with the
following command: code:# tar -xzf
rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

Change to your downloads directory.

cd downloads
tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

This unzips the file, then extracts contents to the file structure. This
is important because the 'make' command will use all relative file
commands. For example it might include one of it's sub directories

../includethis/somefile

Which may or may not have been there when you extracted using your Windows
program.

Got it
QUOTE

You will see tar a lot, also 'gz' files. You can do the same extract in
two stages like this,

gunzip rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

If you then type

ls

You will see the 'gz' file has been replaced with.

rt2500-cvs-daily.tar
(it has been unzipped)

Then the command

tar -xf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar

Extracts the files to a relative file structure. Which means it produces
the original structure that was included in the tar file, but starting at
the current directory.

Now I'm lost again. What are the switches xf (tar the tar) and xzf (tar the

gz)?
Also, it sounds as if the original tar is extracting the files all over the
linux system (from above) but gunzip followed by tar unpacks it to the
download directory? And finally, why do it in 2 commands when one will do?
Can tar operate on gz files?

Note that the daily download is rt2570-cvs-daily.tar.gz and the beta is
rt2570-1.1.0-b1.tar.tar

Now I just don't get this double archive format - if a tarball is an archive
why is it then gzipped or retarred? Obviously I'm missing something
important - from between the ears I suspect.

QUOTE
4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module

cd rt2500-cvs-daily/Module


5) Type:
code:# make

There was a step missing in your instructions.

su


I actually did su right at the start - is that a problem??? I always start
in KDE logging in as me since root isn't an option.

QUOTE
Which will prompt you for your root password. Make will not build
successfully, in this case, if you run it as a standard user.

make

Then watch the screen, at the end of the make you are told whether it was
built successfully.

6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

As you are still root you can just type,

insmod rt2500.ko


I think your instructions will then take you into 'enabling' and then the
security aspect for general wifi connectivity, also there will be a
process of 'discovering' your wireless router. But I suspect it will take
you through doing all of that using GUI tools, so I wont try to guess the
next part for you and you will find theirs easier to follow anyway.

If I get that far I'll be amazed.

BTW, can you recommend a good guide for mandrake /linux novices - "linux for
morons" perhaps?

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: BearItAll    Posted: 2005-08-31 02:23:17    Length: 9,295 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 20:17:49 +0000, the man with no idea wrote:

QUOTE

"BearItAll" [bearitall@rassler.co.uk] wrote in message
news:pan.2005.08.30.16.11.47.140307@rassler.co.uk...
On Mon, 29 Aug 2005 22:17:02 +0000, the man with no idea wrote:

Well I've been trying for ever to get my Belkin F5D7050 usb wireless
dongle
to work to no avail. I happened across some instructions (the easiest
I've
seen) that went like this:
1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads
2) Open a console in the download directory.
3) Unpack the tarball with the following command:
code:# tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz
4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module
5) Type:
code:# make
6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

etc, etc.

I got stuck at stage 3, I couldn't get the tarball to unpack but got an
error message. So I unpacked it on my windows machine using ALZip (which
is
a great freeware utility) and copied the unpacked stuff into tmp.

4: managed to navigate to the right subdirectory
/tmp/rt2750-cvs-20050813/Module (it took me a while before I realised
that
the capitalization is important).

5: typed make and got the following:
make: *** /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk/build:
No such file or directory. Stop.
rt2570.ko failed to build!
make: *** [module] Error 1

Now I do have a /lib/modules/2.6.8.1-12mdk directory but there is no
build
subdirectory. Should there be one?

Could the problem be with the tarball (since the tar command just
produced
an error) - although it did unpack using ALZip in win XP?

Any help appreciated.

As mike said, on the assumption you typed exactly as you printed it here,
you are likely to be typing the prompt as well as the command.

nope


But I also noticed a missing step. So this is you list again, with a couple
of
hints as well.

1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads

Have a directory that is just for this sort of thing, i.e. downloads.

mkdir downloads

Then make sure your browser is pointing there when it offers the save
directory.

Note - not using the internet on the linux machine - due to position I need
to get the wireless adapter working before I can use the web.

But you will be, my hint wasn't meant just for this one situation.
 
QUOTE

Do the same if you use 'wget'. It makes it easy for you to find
them, also you may occasionally want useful downloads written to CD/DVD
and this way you can grab the whole directory.

2) Open a console in the download directory.

3) Unpack the tarball with the
following command: code:# tar -xzf
rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

Change to your downloads directory.

cd downloads
tar -xzf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

This unzips the file, then extracts contents to the file structure. This
is important because the 'make' command will use all relative file
commands. For example it might include one of it's sub directories

../includethis/somefile

Which may or may not have been there when you extracted using your Windows
program.

Got it

You will see tar a lot, also 'gz' files. You can do the same extract in
two stages like this,

gunzip rt2500-cvs-daily.tar.gz

If you then type

ls

You will see the 'gz' file has been replaced with.

rt2500-cvs-daily.tar
(it has been unzipped)

Then the command

tar -xf rt2500-cvs-daily.tar

Extracts the files to a relative file structure. Which means it produces
the original structure that was included in the tar file, but starting at
the current directory.

Now I'm lost again. What are the switches xf (tar the tar) and xzf (tar the
gz)?
Also, it sounds as if the original tar is extracting the files all over the
linux system (from above) but gunzip followed by tar unpacks it to the
download directory? And finally, why do it in 2 commands when one will do?
Can tar operate on gz files?

Note that the daily download is rt2570-cvs-daily.tar.gz and the beta is
rt2570-1.1.0-b1.tar.tar

Now I just don't get this double archive format - if a tarball is an archive
why is it then gzipped or retarred? Obviously I'm missing something
important - from between the ears I suspect.

4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module

cd rt2500-cvs-daily/Module


5) Type:
code:# make

There was a step missing in your instructions.

su


I actually did su right at the start - is that a problem??? I always start
in KDE logging in as me since root isn't an option.

Which will prompt you for your root password. Make will not build
successfully, in this case, if you run it as a standard user.

make

Then watch the screen, at the end of the make you are told whether it was
built successfully.

6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

As you are still root you can just type,

insmod rt2500.ko


I think your instructions will then take you into 'enabling' and then the
security aspect for general wifi connectivity, also there will be a
process of 'discovering' your wireless router. But I suspect it will take
you through doing all of that using GUI tools, so I wont try to guess the
next part for you and you will find theirs easier to follow anyway.

If I get that far I'll be amazed.

BTW, can you recommend a good guide for mandrake /linux novices - "linux for
morons" perhaps?

Included in tar-balls can be empty directories which can be used by make
for intermediate or target files. Some extraction software only re-creates
the structure of the directories that contain files. It is possible that
your windows software needed a switch set to create them.

QUOTE
Now I just don't get this double archive format - if a tarball is an archive
why is it then gzipped or retarred? Obviously I'm missing something
important - from between the ears I suspect.

The tar-ball isn't compressed, it is only a file of concatenated files,
created efficiently such that they is less redundant space than if the
files were on the file system, but no actual compression.

Do this to show yourself how it works. Create two files and fill them with
dummy data like this.

cat /etc/fstab ] test1
cat /etc/fstab ] test2

Now create a tar-ball

tar -ck test1 test2 ] testx.tar

The c means create and the k means to preserve the input files.

Now type

ls -l te*

Compare the sizes.

The tar file isn't actually the sum of the two file sizes, to understand
why you have to understand more about file systems, for now though it is
enough to say that tar packs files in as efficient a way as it can for the
file system it is executing on.

Move our tar file to another location so you can try the extract side.

mv testx.tar /tmp/testx.tar

Change to that directory

cd /tmp

and extract the files.

tar -xf testx.tar

The x means extract and the f as mentioned before recreates the structure
relative to our current position.

Now type

ls -l

to see your files in the /tmp directory.

To compress a tar-ball you use one of the compression utilities, you
can have tar call one of those itself by giving it one of the relevant
flags,

-Z
-z
--compress

Or you can do the two stage version, create the tar and then zip it

gzip testx.tar

They are a lot of good tutorials out there, but I would suggest that you
start with Mandriva's own, on their web site.

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: the man with no idea    Posted: 2005-08-31 10:55:35    Length: 4,150 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
8[

QUOTE
But I also noticed a missing step. So this is you list again, with a
couple
of
hints as well.

1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads

Have a directory that is just for this sort of thing, i.e. downloads.

mkdir downloads

Then make sure your browser is pointing there when it offers the save
directory.

Note - not using the internet on the linux machine - due to position I
need
to get the wireless adapter working before I can use the web.

But you will be, my hint wasn't meant just for this one situation.

Point taken
QUOTE


8[

QUOTE

Included in tar-balls can be empty directories which can be used by make
for intermediate or target files. Some extraction software only re-creates
the structure of the directories that contain files. It is possible that
your windows software needed a switch set to create them.

Now I just don't get this double archive format - if a tarball is an
archive
why is it then gzipped or retarred? Obviously I'm missing something
important - from between the ears I suspect.

The tar-ball isn't compressed, it is only a file of concatenated files,
created efficiently such that they is less redundant space than if the
files were on the file system, but no actual compression.

Do this to show yourself how it works. Create two files and fill them with
dummy data like this.

cat /etc/fstab ] test1
cat /etc/fstab ] test2

Now create a tar-ball

tar -ck test1 test2 ] testx.tar

The c means create and the k means to preserve the input files.

Now type

ls -l te*

Compare the sizes.

The tar file isn't actually the sum of the two file sizes, to understand
why you have to understand more about file systems, for now though it is
enough to say that tar packs files in as efficient a way as it can for the
file system it is executing on.

Move our tar file to another location so you can try the extract side.

mv testx.tar /tmp/testx.tar

Change to that directory

cd /tmp

and extract the files.

tar -xf testx.tar

The x means extract and the f as mentioned before recreates the structure
relative to our current position.

Now type

ls -l

to see your files in the /tmp directory.

To compress a tar-ball you use one of the compression utilities, you
can have tar call one of those itself by giving it one of the relevant
flags,

-Z
-z
--compress

Or you can do the two stage version, create the tar and then zip it

gzip testx.tar

They are a lot of good tutorials out there, but I would suggest that you
start with Mandriva's own, on their web site.


Thanks for all that - much appreciated.

I know this is going to be terribly frustrating for you but, although I get
why you would have tar.gz, I still don't get why you would have tar.tar - is
that the result when you use tar with the x switch? ie is it indicating that
it is a compressed tar that has been compressed by tar itself? I'm off to
the Mandriva site.

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: WCB    Posted: 2005-08-31 11:37:34    Length: 3,333 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
the man with no idea wrote:


QUOTE
Now I'm lost again. What are the switches xf (tar the tar) and xzf (tar
the gz)?
Also, it sounds as if the original tar is extracting the files all over
the linux system (from above) but gunzip followed by tar unpacks it to the
download directory? And finally, why do it in 2 commands when one will do?
Can tar operate on gz files?

Note that the daily download is rt2570-cvs-daily.tar.gz and the beta is
rt2570-1.1.0-b1.tar.tar

Now I just don't get this double archive format - if a tarball is an
archive why is it then gzipped or retarred? Obviously I'm missing
something important - from between the ears I suspect.


There are bunches of competeing compression formats around.
Gunzip, bunzip2 and others.  Tar also has variations,
cpio, apio, and others.  
Man tar, bunzip2, gunzip.  Most tar balls are usually gunzip
or bunzip2.  The x switch usually tells the system to try
to unpack the files, usually it expects gunzip.
There are also ways for unzipping MS files such as zipfiles,
arj, arch, and Mac files and various graphics compression schemes.
Plus perl files and others.

Apropos zip for more compression/uncompression madness.










QUOTE

4) Type:
code:# cd ./rt2500-cvs-*/Module

cd rt2500-cvs-daily/Module


5) Type:
code:# make

There was a step missing in your instructions.

su


I actually did su right at the start - is that a problem??? I always start
in KDE logging in as me since root isn't an option.

Which will prompt you for your root password. Make will not build
successfully, in this case, if you run it as a standard user.

make

Then watch the screen, at the end of the make you are told whether it was
built successfully.

6) To install the module, type:
code:# sudo insmod rt2500.ko

As you are still root you can just type,

insmod rt2500.ko


I think your instructions will then take you into 'enabling' and then the
security aspect for general wifi connectivity, also there will be a
process of 'discovering' your wireless router. But I suspect it will take
you through doing all of that using GUI tools, so I wont try to guess the
next part for you and you will find theirs easier to follow anyway.

If I get that far I'll be amazed.

BTW, can you recommend a good guide for mandrake /linux novices - "linux
for morons" perhaps?

--

Xenu is around and about,
mention Hubbard, Xenu pops out!
No  way for  the clams to stamp Xenu out,
Xenu is around and about!

Cheerful Charlie

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: BearItAll    Posted: 2005-09-01 02:10:18    Length: 4,481 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 16:55:35 +0000, the man with no idea wrote:

QUOTE
8

But I also noticed a missing step. So this is you list again, with a
couple
of
hints as well.

1) Download the newest RT2570 USB nightly CVS tarball from
http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/wiki/index.php/Downloads

Have a directory that is just for this sort of thing, i.e. downloads.

mkdir downloads

Then make sure your browser is pointing there when it offers the save
directory.

Note - not using the internet on the linux machine - due to position I
need
to get the wireless adapter working before I can use the web.

But you will be, my hint wasn't meant just for this one situation.

Point taken


8


Included in tar-balls can be empty directories which can be used by make
for intermediate or target files. Some extraction software only re-creates
the structure of the directories that contain files. It is possible that
your windows software needed a switch set to create them.

Now I just don't get this double archive format - if a tarball is an
archive
why is it then gzipped or retarred? Obviously I'm missing something
important - from between the ears I suspect.

The tar-ball isn't compressed, it is only a file of concatenated files,
created efficiently such that they is less redundant space than if the
files were on the file system, but no actual compression.

Do this to show yourself how it works. Create two files and fill them with
dummy data like this.

cat /etc/fstab ] test1
cat /etc/fstab ] test2

Now create a tar-ball

tar -ck test1 test2 ] testx.tar

The c means create and the k means to preserve the input files.

Now type

ls -l te*

Compare the sizes.

The tar file isn't actually the sum of the two file sizes, to understand
why you have to understand more about file systems, for now though it is
enough to say that tar packs files in as efficient a way as it can for the
file system it is executing on.

Move our tar file to another location so you can try the extract side.

mv testx.tar /tmp/testx.tar

Change to that directory

cd /tmp

and extract the files.

tar -xf testx.tar

The x means extract and the f as mentioned before recreates the structure
relative to our current position.

Now type

ls -l

to see your files in the /tmp directory.

To compress a tar-ball you use one of the compression utilities, you
can have tar call one of those itself by giving it one of the relevant
flags,

-Z
-z
--compress

Or you can do the two stage version, create the tar and then zip it

gzip testx.tar

They are a lot of good tutorials out there, but I would suggest that you
start with Mandriva's own, on their web site.


Thanks for all that - much appreciated.

I know this is going to be terribly frustrating for you but, although I get
why you would have tar.gz, I still don't get why you would have tar.tar - is
that the result when you use tar with the x switch? ie is it indicating that
it is a compressed tar that has been compressed by tar itself? I'm off to
the Mandriva site.

I can't see where you got the tar.tar from. I'll assume you saw it
somewhere.

You can put tar files together in the same way you can any other file, I
used to do something in those lines when I received the backups from
various remote servers before sending them to a tape.

tar -ck first.tar second.tar ] whole.tar

In practise on a single machine it is much less efficient to do that than
it is to add individual files to the tar ball.

The x switch only means 'extract' you use it along with one of the other
flags to tell tar what to extract and where.

[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: no ideas man    Posted: 2005-09-02 03:01:50    Length: 1,195 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
all snipped
QUOTE

I can't see where you got the tar.tar from. I'll assume you saw it
somewhere.


see earlier in thread:
Note that the daily download is rt2570-cvs-daily.tar.gz

and the beta is rt2570-1.1.0-b1.tar.tar


QUOTE
You can put tar files together in the same way you can any other file, I
used to do something in those lines when I received the backups from
various remote servers before sending them to a tape.

tar -ck first.tar second.tar ] whole.tar

In practise on a single machine it is much less efficient to do that than
it is to add individual files to the tar ball.

The x switch only means 'extract' you use it along with one of the other
flags to tell tar what to extract and where.


[Original] [Print] [Top]
Subject: wicked wiki problems
Author: the man with no idea    Posted: 2005-09-08 16:04:07    Length: 1,209 byte(s)
[Original] [Print] [Top]
all snipped
QUOTE

I can't see where you got the tar.tar from. I'll assume you saw it
somewhere.


See earlier in discussion:

"Note that the daily download is rt2570-cvs-daily.tar.gz and the beta is
rt2570-1.1.0-b1.tar.tar"


QUOTE
You can put tar files together in the same way you can any other file, I
used to do something in those lines when I received the backups from
various remote servers before sending them to a tape.

tar -ck first.tar second.tar ] whole.tar

In practise on a single machine it is much less efficient to do that than
it is to add individual files to the tar ball.

The x switch only means 'extract' you use it along with one of the other
flags to tell tar what to extract and where.


[Original] [Print] [Top]
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